The Premier of Symphony No. 7 by Ludwig van Beethoven

On December 8, 1813, exactly two hundred years ago today, Ludwig van Beethoven premiered Symphony No. 7 in Vienna at a Charity concert for the wounded soldiers at the Battle of Hanau. He conducted on orchestra, which was said to have some of the finest of musicians in attendance. Beethoven’s friend, Ignaz Schuppanzigh led the orchestra. Schuppanzigh is a violist and teacher of Beethoven.

The instruments scored for Symphony No. 7 are two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Beethoven dedicated the symphony he created to Count Moritz von Fries. This symphony is in four movements and was composed between 1811 and 1812.

This classical music composition which in its tells us a story in notes and chords, using musical instruments to let our mind wander, or just sit back and read a book. This music provides inspiration, thought and drive. We do not always need music to have words to have great expression. We needed classical music to bet to rock and roll. Without classical music, there would be no hard rock at all.

Now days it is so easy for us to listen to music whether we turn on YouTube or our mp3 player, or stereo, or even or television. It is there at a touch of a button. Beethoven worked with much less, to give us so much. The notes dance across time and space when the symphony is played. Every time his music is heard, it is as if he is still here. The music came from inside of him to us. An early holiday gift and definitely something to be cherished perhaps while doing chores, cooking dinner, or pondering the world (something we all do at one time or another).

Considering there was no electricity, and he was working with a harpsichord, or by piano and by candlelight to create the works of art he gave us. He slaved and slaved to pull the music out of his soul. The Symphony was taunted him because it wanted to be written and it would probably not let him sleep until he had it all down on paper. Beethoven was up night after night, things coming to him in his sleep. He probably dreamed about symphonies. The symphony is forty minutes long so I am sure it took him hours to get it on paper and then to edit it and get the perfect notes and melody. The endless hours of working on a masterpiece, making sure it is pure perfection.

Everything was practice, and testing, to make sure it sounded it, as it was suppose to. This work of art is a fine creation that should be remembered, and listened too. Today, you are a member of the audience listening to Beethoven’s premier of Symphony No. 7. Below you will find the complete symphony. Enjoy!

Cassandra

Reference

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._7_(Beethoven)

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14 Comments

Filed under Historical, Music

14 responses to “The Premier of Symphony No. 7 by Ludwig van Beethoven

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